Based in Denmark, AIDA and their network of resellers bring Danish design to the world. With great design comes a great customer experience. See how Claus Jensen put focus on the customer experience, creating informative, useful knowledge from the day they started.

Christian:

Could you briefly describe why you got involved with customer experience?

Claus – AIDA:

It is basically because we always used to think that we knew how the customer viewed us, meaning that we were pretty certain what we should do – and no one really questioned that.

Previously, every once in a while, we would get an analysis of our position – what the customers were saying and so on – but it was all very much based on one analysis. This picture would be the only thing we used for two to three years before we would do something about it again. It was not as focussed on details as your solution, which provides us with information and comments from individual customers who have actually received our product. Before this, it was more about how the brand was perceived and its position in the market.

This solution gives you much more detailed information. Sometimes it is just a misunderstanding that we need to clarify with the customer or an internal workflow we need to correct. At other times, when it comes to bigger things, it is a setup that needs tailoring. This gives us information about how the customers perceive us, which has definitely changed our perception of how we are viewed in the market.

It has definitely become part of the daily routine because when we get feedback it will be from a customer whom we served yesterday or the day before. Everyone can remember the transaction so it is very present in people’s minds compared to the other approaches, where it becomes very statistical. The big analysis should almost be treated on a strategic level but no one down in production can recognise or identify with this, whereas your solution is very operational. If, for example, a customer is disappointed that their order wasn’t packed properly, we can take a look at it and talk to the stock room or deal with whatever might have caused this.

Christian:

It is one thing that you have recognised the idea of measuring the customer experience, but another thing is your team. How have you got them on board?

Claus – AIDA:

I actually feel that the whole organisation has always been prepared to provide a good customer experience. No one wanted to cut corners but we have all wondered what it would really take to optimise the customer experience. The solution of having our dashboard on a TV screen helps set the standards for what the main focus is when we come to work in the morning. We are there for the customers and we need to provide an excellent service. It becomes much more apparent as the TV screen is hanging there, with constant updates from customers. We had the solution for about a month where we could all just go onto your website, but it was my clear impression that no one knew what our Net Promoter Score was on the Monday, Tuesday and so forth. The first step is therefore to measure customer loyalty. The next step is to convey this internally in the company. It needs to be implemented or it has no value.

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Christian:

Could you tell us where your screen is hanging?

Claus – AIDA:

We have a large open-plan office that is separated by a partition between the sales department and a large management office and that is where it hangs. It is right in the centre of our open-plan office where everyone passes by several times a day.

We have started several specific projects on the basis of the feedback we have received from the customers. To begin with, I personally thought our Norwegian customers were happy, but results have actually shown that there is a general dissatisfaction with our delivery times. This is one of the projects where we have worked together with our team to speed up delivery and with our couriers to get them to do more pickups and to change routes.

Christian:

Does that mean that it has been a bit of an eye-opener?

Claus – AIDA:

Yes, definitely. From the management side there is great emphasis on the fact that this is the tool we will be using. We need to focus on raising our Net Promoter Score, so the TV screen will become a big part of our company.

Christian:

Are you going to use it as a KPI – key performance indicator?

Claus – AIDA:

Yes, I think so. We are in a bit of an evolutionary project, where we first crawl on all fours and then start to stand up slowly. It is a process, but one that we greatly benefit from already. Getting the first bits of feedback was great. It becomes validated by what our sales guys come back and tell us when they return from meetings with customers. The feedback we get via your solution gets circulated across the organisation. Everyone can see it, which gives it much greater importance.

Christian:

I guess it also gives it some transparency?

Claus – AIDA:

Yes, that’s true. A customer actually wrote to us that they never got a reply to their e-mail, despite the fact that we have a policy to reply within 24 hours. But that gave us the option of dealing with it operationally. If we don’t have time to reply within 24 hours, then we need to redistribute the workload.

As I mentioned earlier, all of us want to provide a good service, so it has probably more been a sign that our prioritising and distribution of the workload has not been appropriate. It is this kind of thing that becomes obvious and you can then begin working on that and it becomes a good starting point for a dialogue about how we can solve the problem.

Christian:

I’d like to know more about you. Could you tell me a bit more about yourself, your career and where in the country you are from?

Claus – AIDA:

I am a trained accountant. After working as an accountant for six years, I became a controller in a production company that sold tools in Sunds. After that I went to AIDA where I started in 2003 as Chief Accountant and am now the CFO.

Christian:

Why did you apply for a job with AIDA?

Claus – AIDA:

Mostly due to the culture around AIDA. It is a very dynamic company, which I think is great. Things are on the move and there is a great work environment.

Christian:

Do you have any personal projects – I mean company-related ones – within the next year or two? Is your focus for the future in one specific place?

Claus – AIDA:

Yes, we have a large project – a lean project. We want to make lean project management a permanent process within the company so we always try and challenge ourselves to do things in the most optimal way possible. Rule number one when it comes to lean is that if it doesn’t make sense to the customer, you shouldn’t do it – or at least minimise it as much as possible. That fits very well with the Net Promoter Score where we get feedback from the appropriate places. If I had to say what is really going to push us forward, it is the lean project. It permeates everything and all our ways of doing things.

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